European Journal for Philosophy of Religion https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr <p><em>European Journal for Philosophy of Religion </em>(EJPR) is a peer-reviewed international journal devoted to the problems of the philosophy of religion.</p> en-US deputy.editor@philosophy-of-religion.eu (Prof. Dr. Georg Gasser) managing.editor@philosophy-of-religion.eu (Marco Benasso) Wed, 29 Dec 2021 23:00:33 +0100 OJS 3.3.0.8 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Philosophy, Theology, and Philosophical-Theological Biblical Exegesis https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3733 <p>-</p> Eleonore Stump, Judith Wolfe Copyright (c) 2021 European Journal for Philosophy of Religion https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3733 Wed, 29 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0100 Job's Final Insight, Narratives, and the Brain https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3746 <p> In continental philosophy of religion, the hermeneutics of narratives takes a central role. Analytic philosophy of religion, on the other hand, considers religious statements mostly as assertions of fact. It examines the logical form and semantics of religious statements, addresses their logical commitments, and examines their epistemological status. Using the example of a passage in the Book of Job, it is investigated whether the methods of analytic philosophy are also suitable for analyzing religious narratives. The question is explored whether there is a genuine form of knowledge, besides propositional factual knowledge, which is bound to the form of narration. Particular attention will be paid to the inter-personal pragmatic embeddedness of narratives. The connection between second-personal knowledge and narratives is examined. Using the historical example of Ignatius of Loyola's theory of religious knowledge, it is argued that propositional argumentative knowledge is only one form of religious knowledge among others. The others are second-personal and narrative in character. Having thus established this distinct form of knowledge, it is asked whether our best empirical knowledge of the neurophysiological basis of intuitive and non-argumentative cognition provides a foundation for better understanding inter-personal religious cognition within narratives.</p> Godehard Brüntrup Copyright (c) 2021 European Journal for Philosophy of Religion https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3746 Wed, 29 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0100 Revelation and the Veridicality of Narratives https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3734 <p> On Christian doctrine, God is love; and the love of God is most manifest in Christ’s passion. The passion of Christ thus matters to philosophical theology’s examination of the divine attribute of love. But the passion of Christ is presented in a biblical story, and there are serious methodological questions about the way in which a biblical story can be used as evidence in philosophical theology. And these questions in turn raise deeper epistemological questions. How does any narrative transmit knowledge? And what counts as veridicality in a narrative? This paper deals with some of the questions for philosophical theology and then concentrates on the more general epistemological questions about narratively transmitted knowledge.</p> <p> </p> Eleonore Stump Copyright (c) 2021 European Journal for Philosophy of Religion https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3734 Wed, 29 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0100 Storied Identity https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3724 <p>In this paper, I explore two ways of understanding the moral and spiritual significance of stories, and in turn two ways of developing the notion of storied identity, and hence two ways of reading the Bible. I propose that these two approaches to the biblical text provide the basis for a fruitful interpretation of the Christian rite of the Eucharist, so that, to this extent, we can take the Eucharist to support these ways of drawing out the sense of the text. Accordingly, we can speak of reading the Bible eucharistically. The aim of the paper is not to substantially explain central features of the Eucharist as it has been understood in mainstream Christian teaching but, more modestly, to consider how these two ways of approaching the biblical text may help to bring some aspects of the rite, as depicted in Christian thought, into rather clearer focus, including its social dimension, and the relationship, on the Christian understanding, between the divine presence in the Incarnation and in the Eucharist.</p> Mark Wynn Copyright (c) 2021 European Journal for Philosophy of Religion https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3724 Wed, 29 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0100 Abraham’s Empty Altars https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3730 <p> In this paper I examine the ritual life of Abraham as it is presented in the book of Genesis. Paying close attention to the language of the narrative, I try to reconstruct the evolving philosophical theology that seems to underlie the modes of worship that Abraham develops over time. Read in this light, the life of Abraham can help us to rethink the extent to which theistic religiosity requires a personal God, and the extent to which it can survive in the face of a more austere impersonal theology.</p> Samuel Lebens Copyright (c) 2021 European Journal for Philosophy of Religion https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3730 Wed, 29 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0100 Gadamer, Barth, and Transcendence in Biblical Interpretation https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3732 <p> The essay reflects on how Hans-Georg Gadamer and Karl Barth view interpretation of the Christian Bible. It proceeds in three main sections. The first contends that Gadamer secularizes Christian theology, and that this has drawbacks for the sort of reading his hermeneutic can give to Christian Scripture. The second part turns to Barth, arguing that the whole structure of his approach to the Bible factors in theological commitment, with benefits for the readings he can deliver. The final part makes a case that contemporary reflection on interpretation can nonetheless glean important insights from Gadamer, especially regarding the readerly reception of texts, because his perspective has a certain sort of richness that Barth’s cannot match. The overall suggestion emerging from the interrogation of these two thinkers is that phenomenology and theology might learn from one another, that they each contribute something valuable to discussions of biblical interpretation.</p> <p> </p> Darren Sarisky Copyright (c) 2021 European Journal for Philosophy of Religion https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3732 Wed, 29 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0100 The Renewal of Perception in Religious Faith and Biblical Narrative https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3744 <p> Religious faith may manifest itself, among other things, as a mode of seeing the ordinary world, which invests that world imaginatively (or inspiredly) with an unseen depth of divine intention and spiritual significance. While such seeing may well be truthful, it is also unavoidably constructive, involving the imagination in its philosophical sense of the capacity to organize underdetermined or ambiguous sense date into a whole or gestalt. One of the characteristic ways in which biblical narratives inspire and teach is by renewing their characters’ and readers’ imagination. The texts do so not inexorably but in a similar way as (other) works of art. This paper therefore investigates the ways in which works of art engage and develop the imagination, and thereby enable renewed perceptual and cognitive engagement with the world. The paper introduces predictive processing as a helpful psychological theory for analyzing this dynamic, and outlines questions for further research.</p> Judith Wolfe Copyright (c) 2021 European Journal for Philosophy of Religion https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3744 Wed, 29 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0100 Simply Unsuccessful: The Neo-Platonic Proof of God’s Existence https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3412 <p><span>Edward Feser defends the ‘Neo-Platonic proof’ for the existence of the God of classical theism. After articulating the argument and a number of preliminaries, I first argue that premise three of Feser’s argument – the causal principle that every composite object requires a sustaining efficient cause to combine its parts – is both unjustified and dialectically ill-situated. I then argue that the Neo-Platonic proof fails to deliver the mindedness of the absolutely simple being and instead militates against its mindedness. Finally, I uncover two tensions between Trinitarianism and the Neo-Platonic proof and one tension between the Neo-Platonic proof (and, more generally, classical theism) and the incarnation.</span></p> Joseph Conrad Schmid Copyright (c) 2021 European Journal for Philosophy of Religion https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3412 Wed, 29 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0100 Representing the Parent Analogy https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3363 <p>I argue that Stephen Wykstra’s much discussed Parent Analogy is helpful in responding to the evidential problem of evil when it is expanded upon from a positive skeptical theist framework. This framework, defended by John Depoe, says that although we often remain in the dark about the first-order reasons that God allows particular instances of suffering, we can have positive second-order reasons that God would create a world with seemingly gratuitous evils. I respond to recent challenges to the Parent Analogy by arguing that God, like a good parent, wants a rightly ordered relationship of mutual love with created beings.</p> Jannai Shields Copyright (c) 2021 European Journal for Philosophy of Religion https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3363 Wed, 29 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0100 Review of Negative Theology and Philosophical Analysis: Only the Splendour of Light https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3707 Lorraine Keller Copyright (c) 2021 European Journal for Philosophy of Religion https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3707 Wed, 29 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0100 Review of: Mark R. Wynn, Spiritual Traditions and the Virtues: Living Between Heaven and Earth https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3708 <p>-</p> Donald J. Bungum Copyright (c) 2021 European Journal for Philosophy of Religion https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3708 Wed, 29 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0100 Review of: Laura Ekstrom, God, Suffering, and the Value of Free Will https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3709 <p>-</p> Perry Hendrix Copyright (c) 2021 European Journal for Philosophy of Religion https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3709 Wed, 29 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0100 Review of: Mark C. Murphy. Divine Holiness & Divine Action https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3710 <p>-</p> Jacqueline Mariña Copyright (c) 2021 European Journal for Philosophy of Religion https://philosophy-of-religion.eu/index.php/ejpr/article/view/3710 Wed, 29 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0100